The floristic inventories compiled from 2001 to 2008 mention the richness of the meadows and the shrubby habitats that surround them: 231 plant species were catalogued. The most remarkable meadow species (owing both to their populations and their attractive aspect) are the orchids but they are not the only ones.

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The Bee Orchid

The Bee Orchid (Ophrys apifera) is a great example of nature's ingenuity: its flowers are a perfect imitation of the appearance of a bee, right down to the insect's hairiness. The Bee Orchid is pollinated by Solitary Bees and not Domestic Bees. The males will confuse the flower with a female bee and attempt to mate with it, from flower to flower. They thus ensure its pollination.

The plant flowers between May and July and prefers to grow in poor, dry limestone soil.

The Pyramidal Orchid

The Pyramidal Orchid (Anacamptis pyramidalis) grows on the reserve's dykes and in the meadows. This orchid is pollinated by Lepidoptera but does not have any nectar.

The Parma Violet

The Parma Violet (Viola alba) grows at the foot of the dyke in the alluvial meadow in March-April. Its fragrant flowers are white and rarely violet in colour, unlike the other violets. The plant is included in the Red List Alsace.

Photographs © Camille HELLIO :
Bee Orchid - Parma Violet - Orchis fuchsii